Category Archives: Sermon

Being Community in a Divisive World

This past weekend I had the privilege of being with the good people at Park Road Baptist Church in Charlotte, where my dear friends Russ and Amy Dean are co-pastors.  Being on sabbatical, and not preaching for 2 months, this was a good reminder of what it is like to preach.  Here is the manuscript I took into the pulpit.  Hopefully it is close to what I said!

 

Being Community in a Divisive World
I Corinthians 3:1-9

Dr. Don Flowers, Jr.
Park Road Baptist Church, Charlotte, NC
February 12, 2017

It is an honor for me to be with you this morning.  Park Road is a congregation that has long been an example to many of us of what a church can, and should be like.  Your willingness to be church today, to experiment, to do things differently, to try and sometime fail, says a lot about who you are and the God you serve.  It is faithfulness not necessarily success that we are called to.  Thank you for being you!

And it is always wonderful being with your pastors.  Russ and Amy have been friends for longer than any of us care to remember.  From days as youth ministers when Amy came to the aid of our youth group after one of our girls was run over by a police car coming to assist another girl who had broken her arm…to last week watching Russ work diligently as most of our Preacher Camp group gathered in the frigid cold of Maryland!  There is a reason God loved me enough to let me live in the South.  Your pastors are friends, examples, mentors, pastors to me.  Sharing the pulpit where they speak week after week is a privilege and a bit intimidating!

Thank you.  And know that if you are ever in Charleston, Conde Nast top city in America to visit, (that’s our Chamber of Commerce ad that we are required to give anytime we leave the city limits) I do hope that along with the beaches and the plantations and the market and the incredible restaurants, you will come and visit us at Providence.  We would be honored to have you worship with us.

During these days of Epiphany you have been exploring the theme, (Re)Defining Community.  We return again to a congregation that was in the midst of that for the first time, in the first century, the church at Corinth.  Our text this morning is from chapter 3.

Will you hear these words of our Lord.

And so, brothers and sisters, I could not speak to you as spiritual people, but rather as people of the flesh, as infants in Christ. I fed you with milk, not solid food, for you were not ready for solid food. Even now you are still not ready, for you are still of the flesh. For as long as there is jealousy and quarreling among you, are you not of the flesh, and behaving according to human inclinations? For when one says, “I belong to Paul,” and another, “I belong to Apollos,” are you not merely human?

What then is Apollos? What is Paul? Servants through whom you came to believe, as the Lord assigned to each. I planted, Apollos watered, but God gave the growth. So neither the one who plants nor the one who waters is anything, but only God who gives the growth. The one who plants and the one who waters have a common purpose, and each will receive wages according to the labor of each. For we are God’s servants, working together; you are God’s field, God’s building.

On a sunny spring day go to a graduation ceremony at any seminary or divinity school in the country.  Go up to any graduate and in between the pictures and the hugs and the well wishes, ask them what they expect to discover in the church they are heading to.  Their answers would be not unlike the answers you would get from the people in your congregation on any given Sunday morning if they were asked to describe the church of their dreams.

“A church where everyone loves each other.”
“A church where everyone is welcomed.”
“A church where the needs of individuals are met.”
“A church where people come to know the depth of life.”
“A church where worship is moving and the preaching is great.”
“A church where people meet Jesus.”
“A church where the bills are paid!”  (There is always one realist in the mix!)

But soon after arriving most of these young ministers will be hit in the face with the reality of church.  It is not all sweetness and harmony.  There are conflicts in paradise.  And the causes…

“The preschool has used our glue again!”
“Who thought it would be a good idea to rent a bus to take the kids to camp?”
“I think we need to cut the education budget so we can give more to missions” (or visa versa)
“We have been in this Sunday School classroom for 50 years!  I don’t see why we have to move now!”
“What does the pastor do on her day off anyway?”
“Are we having communion again?”  Followed closely by “It’ about time we had communion!”

Does that sound familiar?  (Not in your church, of course, but the one you heard about across town?)

The reality is that churches large and small deal with conflict.  It come around budget time, with personnel, with theology and worship style and the décor of the sanctuary and classrooms.  It is not just the local church but THE Church that is conflicted.

Denominations are breaking apart over disagreements about missions and women and sexuality and budgets.  Throw in the larger world with issues of politics and race and immigration and poverty and education and and and…..

At times we just want to throw our hands up and scream, “Can’t we just get along?”  Given the level of discord we can understand why the fastest growing religious group in our country are the “Nones,” those who claim no religious affiliation!

We dream of a time when the church was like our dreams, the way that Jesus wanted it to be!  But it was never that way!  Did you hear it in that great hymn we sing this morning, “The Church’s One Foundation.”  We nod our heads through the first verse, “The church’s one foundation is Jesus Christ our Lord; we are his new creation by water and the Word; from heaven he came and sought us to be his holy bride; with his own blood he bought us, and for our life he died.”

One foundation!  We are all united, one in the spirit, one in the Lord!  (Ooops, different song!)  But if we continue singing, we get to a verse that starts off, “Though with a scornful wonder the world sees us oppressed, by schisms rent asunder, by heresies distressed…”

Wait!  In the church with one foundation we are rent asunder and distressed by heresies?

It is so!  And in fact, it always has been!  There never was a conflict free church!  At least not after the second member joined!  Divisions happens!  It happened in Corinth, for many of the same reasons we face today.  It would have been, it would be easier if the dissension was organized, but it was legion.  There were multiple issue then, just like today!

And the conflicts seem to catch Paul off guard.  It seems that he had intended to write a letter filled with love and kisses!  As soon as he has finished the “Dear Corinthian Church” (which follows the ancient custom and is a lot more flowery and ornate) he sings their praises.

I give thanks to my God always for you because of the grace of God that has been given you in Christ Jesus, for in every way you have been enriched in him, in speech and knowledge of every kind— just as the testimony of Christ has been strengthened among you— so that you are not lacking in any spiritual gift as you wait for the revealing of our Lord Jesus Christ.

I give thanks to my God always…  What a strong and encouraging statement.  It sets the tone for what Paul wants to write!

But it seems he never got a chance!  Perhaps he had just penned those words (remember there was not a backspace/delete button.  Papyrus doesn’t just grow on trees!  Well, it sorta does!) when Chloe’s people arrive with some questions from a an earlier letter he had sent.  Even more, Chloe’s people are able to fill in the blanks, to really give Paul the scoop as to what was happening in Corinth!  And when he hears, well suddenly the tone of the letter changes.  He can’t write love and kisses!  There are conflicts that must be addressed.

Paul had founded the church in Corinth and nurtured the fledgling congregation, but the time came when he needed to go to other mission fields.  Though he loved the church, there were other congregations to start, other ministries to birth.

The church in Corinth was not left alone, however.  Other ministers came to be among them.  There were evangelists and missionaries who were just passing through, sharing their wisdom and theology, gifts, ideas.  Just like today, some had more appeal than others.

That was what was happening in Corinth!  Since Paul’s departure there had been a series of other preachers who had come, namely Apollos.  According to Acts, Apollos was a learned Jew from Alexandria “who taught accurately the things concerning Jesus.”  He was an eloquent and passionate speaker, and “he greatly helped those who through grace had become believers.” He had an audience who admired him and the way he presented the gospel.

There was still another group, however.  These were the “back to basics” folks who wanted to go all the way back to the original apostles.  There was a Cephas following in the church at Corinth.  There is no evidence that Peter had ever been to Corinth, but perhaps someone had been to Jerusalem and heard him speak, or had heard of him from another source who had been impressed.

Even that was not enough for some in the church!  These were the back to Jesus folk!  They weren’t interested in this new religion!  If it had been good enough for Jesus, it was good enough for them!  You almost have to wonder if this was a real faction within the Corinth church or an example of Paul’s sarcasm.  And all of these people, all of these groups, all of these parties knew they were right!

It would be easy to see the situation in Corinth as the original church fight, but that would miss the deeper theological issues being played out.  Remember Paul was writing to a congregation that lived in a particular context, with a history of philosophy and culture that weren’t “Christian.”  One of the leading philosophical influences was that of wisdom.  In this world wisdom did not mean getting straight A’s, but rather a preference for Sophia, the Greek worship of wisdom.  This showed a continuing fascination with the Greek values inherent in that system.

The Greek wisdom philosophy put a great emphasis on rhetoric, being able to argue a position in a way that was convincing to others.  Apparently, Appollos’ preaching style fit in this mold and thus fed the fascination some had with that philosophy.

Others were arguing over baptism.  The old joke (which really isn’t that much of a joke) is of ministers getting together and the first question being asked was how many baptisms they had the previous year.  It was almost a badge of honor.

The same thing was true in the early church.  Appollos had baptized many, and so many were discounting the work of Paul.  It is easy to read Paul’s response as being defensive, and in some ways it is!  But is also points out an important theological issue.  What is the meaning of baptism?  Is it a gateway into membership? Is it a hoop that one has to jump through to be a Christian?  Is it an initiation rite?  Is one method better, more Christian than another?  I know individuals who have refused to join a church because they were told that they had to be baptized again, as if their first baptism was illegitimate.  What is the meaning of baptism?

It is always easier to focus on the “presenting problem” rather than on the deeper issue.  It is easier to fight about the way we baptize rather than struggle with the meaning behind it.  It is easier to fight about how we do communion rather than ponder what the table means.

Meaning questions force us to delve into areas of theology, meaning, what is really going on in us.  Those are much tougher to wrestle with because they can’t be resolved in a 20 minute sermon or a 30 minute Bible Study.  The disconcerting truth is that in our world, with our philosophical system, we do prefer “sound bite/bumper sticker theology.”  It works better for our elevator speech, around the water cooler.  It is easier for a Twitter world.

Dealing with meaning will reveal our differences.  So it is easier just to ignore them, especially in light of Paul’s admonition in I Corinithians 1:10 in which he calls on the members to be in agreement, to have no division, to be united.  We normally read that as being all cut from the same pattern with no difference at all.

But the word used here is the same one Mark used when he talks about the disciples mending their nets when Jesus called them to follow.  Mending the nets did not mean the were all the same!  Mending did not make the hole disappear!   The mending was to assure that the nets held together.

That is the question Paul is raising for the people of Corinth and the people of your congregation.  What holds us together?  Is it the pastor?  The way we do worship?  Our Wednesday night pot-luck suppers?  Our missions in _____________?

It is an important question for a congregation to ask.  What is it that hold us?  But it is just as important to ask what holes are acceptable.  Does everyone have to be the same, do the same, believe the same?  Where are holes acceptable?  Are holes, differences, acceptable?

It was a Wednesday evening many years ago, when our daughters were young.  Anita was at choir practice so it was my job to get the girls home and in bed.  I was putting Savannah, our youngest to bed and it came time to say prayers.

At that time she was in Mission Friends, being taught by Cyndy, one of our friends, who I will say has an amazing prayer life.  Whenever she offers a prayer in church I am just amazed.  Our girls often will call and ask that I get Cyndy to pray for something.  Not me, the pastor!  Cyndy!  As they say, God pays more attention to her!  And it is true!

That night, as Savannah began her prayers, what struck me was that she was praying like Cyndy.  I can’t do that!  I couldn’t teach her that!  I needed some help.

But several months later we were coming home from University.  I was driving the van and Cyndy’s daughter was sitting in the front seat—to help keep me awake, but also to talk.  In the middle of the trip, in the middle of the conversation, I realized that I was having a conversation with her that she couldn’t have with her mother.  Cyndy needed me too!

We need each other.  We need each other to mend the nets, to make sure the holes stay together.  We need each other to keep us from idolatry, from the heresy that we have God captured, all figured out.  We need people with a different perspective, different views, different gifts.

But that only happens when we are willing to be servants to each other.  Paul and Apollos were both servants.  The word used here is diakonos, deacon.  That is what we are called to be.  You who are being ordained today; Russ and Amy, me, you!  It isn’t about privilege and power, but about being a servant.  Listening and learning from each other; looking to ways that we might work together to build God’s kingdom.

Even this day.

I look forward to being back at Providence for Ash Wednesday, and then in the pulpit on March 5 as we begin a Lenten series entitled, From Pew to Passion.

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Wait! Someone was listening?

I will admit it.  Most of the time I wonder if anyone is paying any attention to my sermon.  And I understand why.  Week after week, blah blah blah blah Jesus, blah blah blah God. Amen.  We have heard it all before.  No one is paying any attention. 

But then one morning you are reading your paper and suddenly you see your idea, your thought show up in the national news!  Someone that wasn’t even in worship that morning has obviously caught wind of your idea and now wants to make it national policy!

It happened today!  Well, the sermon was this summer, a sermon about Zacchaeus.  (I will pause for a moment while you sing the song.  Zacchaeus was a wee little man, a wee little man was he….)

Anyway, as a way of explaining who he was, and how he had earned his wealth, I gave this explanation.

And in this place, in this place Zacchaeus was a tax collector.  No, not A tax collector, but the chief tax collector!  It was a job that was the envy of all.  Sure, it meant that he had to conspire with the Romans; it meant that he bore the scorn of all his fellow Jews—but when you are living in one of the nicest homes in the winter capitol you can put up with a lot of scorn!

And it wasn’t like he had done anything wrong.  He had just worked the system the way it was set up!  The Romans had fashioned a system to collect taxes from their far-flung empire.  They appointed a chief tax collector who had the responsibility of sending Rome a certain amount of money each year.  If the revenue got to Rome all was well.  If it didn’t, it was the chief tax collector’s head that was on the line—or chopping block—literally!  All they wanted was the money!  How that was collected was not their concern! 

Imagine for a moment that you had that job, and Columbia said that you needed to send $100,000 this month to the coffers.  How would you do it?  Tax income—you can.  But what if you decided instead to tax every car that crossed a river?  Imagine how much money you would bring in if there was a toll booth before every bridge in Charleston—and it cost just $1.00 to cross—every bridge!  I mean, it’s only a dollar.  Not that much, but after a while, it would start to add up, because remember the fee goes each way!  Every car, every truck, every vehicle crossing a bridge pays $1.00.  How much revenue would that bring in?  This week Brian Hicks reported that there are 55,000 cars that use the Ashley River bridge every day!  Can you do the math?

And remember, you only have to send Columbia $100,000!  And if you can tax a car on the bridges, why not on the roads without bridges?  And why not the boats that come up the rivers?  Do you see the profit in this!

That is how Zacchaeus had gotten rich.  He had added another tax to the people’s burden in order to pad his pocket.  He hadn’t done anything wrong.  He had played by the system; he had worked his way up the ladder; he had succeeded!  He was rich!

12chao-master768Now obviously this wasn’t meant to be government policy!  At least, I didn’t think it was.  So imagine my surprise when I read that yesterday in her nomination hearing to become Secretary of Transportation, Elaine L. Chao, wife of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of KY, suggested that we might want to explore more public-private partnerships as a way of improving our nation’s sagging infrastructure.

Now on it’s face, that looks like a great idea!  Why raise gas taxes when we can drive on the Vulcan Materials Motorway.  (Ms Chao is on the board of Vulcan Materials)  And who could be against the Halliburton Highway?  It is their money that is funding it, right?

Remember that when you pay the toll on the road!

But wait!  It was my idea shared at Providence Baptist!  Maybe we should just but the Providence Baptist Wando Bridge on I-526!  It is the way people from Mt. Pleasant get to church!  We could charge $1.00 for everyone to cross it.  We will give a pass to church members who have made a pledge!  The funds will be used for missions, and good stuff!  It will be a definite membership enhancement!  You don’t have to join to use our bridge.  Just pay $1.00—each way.  Of course, you can always take another route.  And we aren’t doing anything wrong!  It is just the way the rules work.

Maybe I should listen to my sermon!

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Wisdom from today? No! But For Today!

As the title says, there are some items that I come across that just don’t make the sermon.  They are goo0d, but they just don’t fit.  But they still need to be shared!

Here is one of those I came across last week.  They are from Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and seem so appropriate for this political season.

15584“Folly is a more dangerous enemy to the good than evil.  One can protest against evil; it can be unmasked and, if need be, prevented by force.  Evil always carries the seeds of its own destruction, as it makes pool, at the least, uncomfortable.  Against folly we have no defense.  Neither protests nor force can touch it; reasoning is no use; facts that contradict personal prejudices can simply be disbelieved—indeed, the fool can counter by criticizing them, and if they are undeniable, they can just be pushed aside as trivial exceptions. 

So the fool, as distinct from the scoundrel, is completely self-satisfied; in fact he can easily become dangerous, as it does not make much to make him aggressive.  A fool must therefore be treated more cautiously than a scoundrel; we shall never again try to convince a fool by reason, for it is both useless and dangerous.”

Dietrich Bonhoeffer.  Letters and Papers from Prison.

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“I’ve Got to Buy Christmas!”

This year for Advent our congregation has joined the Advent Conspiracy, a movement to help us regain some balance in our celebration of Christmas by focusing on four guiding principles–Worship Fully; Spend Less; Give More; Love All.  Those ideas form the center of our worship each week as we move towards Christmas.  This past week we focused on Spend Less.

So imagine my surprise to overhear a conversation this morning.  A lady was discussing the need to see a doctor but she responded, “I can’t go to the doctor now!  I have to buy Christmas!”

Now I know what she meant.  There are gifts that she wants to get for her children, her family, those she loves.  She is struggling with how to balance our need to express our love for others while balancing our checkbooks.  I so understand that pressure!

But the echo of Sunday keeps coming back to me.  Spend Less.  It is not only good economic advice, it is a vital reminder that we can’t “Buy Christmas!”  It isn’t something we buy!  It is a gift we receive.

It was another time when I wished I had heard the story before my sermon.  I would have included it, maybe at the end.  I would have told the story and then we would have sung the old revival song, “Jesus Paid it All.”  

Not Joy to the World, but rather appropriate as we conspire this Advent.

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Wine in a Baptist Church

One for me, One for Me!Well, not really!  But this Sunday at Providence we will be looking at the first miracle Jesus does in John’s gospel–changing water to wine.  Or Welch’s grape juice as many of us were taught!

And why?  Because we know wine is of Satan!  True!  I found this Jewish Midrash (a story about scripture) that won’t make the sermon, but could have been written by some of my Baptist brethren!

Hope you enjoy it–along with a good glass of wine!

Once while Noah was hard at work, breaking the ground for a vineyard, Satan drew near and inquired what he was doing, “What are you planting?”

Noah: “A vineyard.”

Satan: “And what may be the qualities of its fruit?”

Noah: “The fruit it bears is sweet, be it dry or moist. It yields wine that gladdens the heart of man.”

Satan: “Let us go into partnership in this business of planting a vineyard.”

Noah: “Agreed.”
Satan thereupon slaughtered a lamb and then in succession a lion, a pig and monkey, and fertilized the soil with each in turn. Thus Satan conveyed to Noah the qualities of wine. If a man drinks one glass, he is as meek as a lamb; if he drinks two glasses, he is boastful and feels as strong as a lion; if he drinks three or four glasses, then behaves like a monkey, he dances around, sings, talks obscenely and does not know what he is doing; and if he becomes intoxicated, he resembles the pig.”

http://www.jhom.com/topics/wine/noah.htm#4

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Epiphany Humor

Working on my sermon for Sunday about the Wise Men.   For a long time I thought I would use this story as the beginning, and we will see if I should have stuck with that idea, but before it falls into the trash folder I thought I would share it here.  It is the obligatory “If the Wise Men Had Been Women” joke:

What would have happened if it had been three Wise Women instead of three Wise Men? 

They would have asked directions, arrived on time, helped deliver the baby, cleaned the stable, made a casserole, and brought practical gifts. 

But what they would have said when they left…? 

“Did you see the sandals Mary was wearing with that gown?” 
“That baby doesn’t look anything like Joseph!”
“Virgin? Yeah!  I knew her in school!” 
“Can you believe that they let all of those disgusting animals in the house?” 
“I heard that Joseph isn’t even working right now!” 
“And that donkey that they are riding has seen better days too!” 
“Want to bet on how long it will take until you get your casserole dish back?” 

It won’t make the sermon (at least I don’t think so) but you will tell it!

wise women

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Jesus and The Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

It is a horrible thing to have the thought on Sunday morning, “I should have done this with the sermon!”  But that is what happened this morning.  (Truth be told it happens more than we would like to admit!)  I was going through my sermon in my head, thinking about the children’s sermon, wondering what to say about Jesus getting lost in the temple.

I could talk about getting lost (which is probably what I am going to do) but somehow had a flashback to being in the 4th

booksGrade.  I had a wonderful teacher, Mrs. Upchurch.  After lunch everyday we would have story time.  I remember her reading  Charlotte’s Web (how we were pulling for Wilbur!) She also read to us the wonderful story of The Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.  It is the story of two children who run away from home and hide out in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  To be honest, I don’t remember the entire story, but even now remember how they took baths in the fountain, and took coins that they used for food.

So this morning (this really does come together) I started wondering about 12 year old Jesus.  He was gone for 3 days in the temple.  There are all sorts of questions that came to my mind!

  • What did he eat?  Have you ever tried to feed a 12-year-old boy?  Where did he get all that food?  How did he pay for it?  Or is this a miracle that didn’t get recorded?
  • Where did he sleep?  Do you think he snuck back into the Holy of Holies to sleep in his Dad’s room?
  • What was going on with those elders?  Did they not become a bit suspicious about this kids who is hanging out at the temple and doesn’t seem to have anyone looking out for him?  Did they ask any questions?  Did they invite him home for the evening?

As you can imagine, none of this made my sermon this morning.  (You can read what the good people at Providence heard this morning here.)

But…

Maybe in three years when this text shows up again….

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